Garay Alphabet: a Wolof Script

Abstract graphic of the letters and numbers of the Garay alphabet.

or Garay is an alphabet created specifically for Wolof, a language widely spoken in Senegal and parts of the Gambia and Mauritania. Traditionally, Wolof was written with an adapted version of the Arabic script called Wolofal. While this is still a common writing system, the use of the Latin alphabet has steadily risen since Senegal …

The Mandé Ritual Clown

Photography of the chief korèduga of Mimana in Mali by Jethro Massey. The clown or buffoon is wearing strips of torn cloth and a colorful monkey mask.

“To understand comedy is to understand humanity, for the comic sense is central to what it means to be human”. ― Conrad Hyers, The Spirituality of Comedy, Comic Heroism in a Tragic World Predestined to Provoke Comedians, contrarians, jokesters and tricksters have made their appearance in all human societies, from the more or less secular, bell-capped …

The Zaouli Mask Dance of the Ivory Coast

Photography of a Zaouli mask and dancer.

A homage to feminine beauty, this traditional West African performance art is protected by UNESCO’s Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, 2017 Each Guro village in the Ivory Coast has its prized Zaouli dancer. Although always incarnated by a man, the mask itself represents the beautiful daughter of Zaouli ― …

3 Tales from the Ivory Coast

Korhogo cloth of the Senufo people, depicting characters from tales of the Ivory Coast.

Like most tales indigenous to West Africa, the allegories and traditional narratives passed down through generations of Ivorians enthrall and edify, startle and steer, recreate and reinforce the social values of their listeners. Through a panoply of characters — fantastical monsters, rebellious protagonists — ethical dichotomies unfold: the role of the individual, the stranger, the …

The Blacksmith

Black and white photograph of a blacksmith axe laying on the ground with cowrie shells as an offering in Sierra Leone.

“When iron is heated in a charcoal fire to white-hot temperatures, skilled African blacksmiths move the metal like clay. Using hammers as an extension of their hands, they can model any shape they desire upon their anvils. With astonishing technical prowess these artists have, for over 2,500 years, created the essential and the conceptual, the …

The Power of a Name

Black and white lithograph of a family sitting, backs turned, on a bench. There are three small children, and four adults. They are facing a woman who is embracing them all. The image is reminiscent of an African naming ceremony, where a child is given a name or several names.

To the Shakespearean question “What’s in a name?”, West Africa’s answer is “Everything”. In a world where even the act of speaking is infused with power, birth names ― whether protective or emboldening, proverbial or predictive, exalted or even seemingly indelicate ― are of the highest traditional significance. So, too, the ceremonies that surround them. …

The Talking Drum

Photograph of a West African talking drum, in the shape of an hourglass with tension strings surrounding its sides and a scarf tied loosely around the top. On top of the drumhead lies the curved percussion stick used to beat the drum.

“The most important of all the drums,” [Ogotemmêli] says, “is the talking drum.  It is the Nommo who made it.” “He threaded it with his fingers, as children do today with string games. Spreading his hands, he passed the thread ten times in each of his four fingers, the thumb not being used. He thus …